top of page
  • Writer's picturePaolo Ferla

HOW TO WRITE A KILLER PHOTOGRAPHY BRIEF

Updated: May 22, 2023

The brief is our bible when we’re on a photo shoot. We hope this article gives you some good advice on how to write a photography brief.

It helps us understand what you want to achieve, and lets us know exactly what we need to capture during the day.


Whether it's for product photography or a stop-motion animation, spending the time nailing your photography brief ahead of time is well worth it. We'll have more time to spend taking killer photos and you get the most from your shoot!


We split our photography briefs into a few key areas:



1. SET-UPS

A set-up is basically the scene we’re shooting in. This includes surfaces, backdrops and lighting styles. The more detail you can give us the better!

There's a lot to consider here, so let's break it down into a few points:


  • Is it a simple white background for packshots or e-commerce listings? Or a lifestyle set-up, with backdrops and props ?

  • What kind of situation or mood do you want to capture? For example, are we creating a bright summer’s picnic vibe? Or a cosy winter’s evening at home?

  • Is there a theme, such as Valentine’s day or Halloween?

  • Would you like any hands or models interacting with your product?

  • Do you want it shot face-on or from above?

  • Would you prefer the lighting to be soft and gentle, or bright with hard shadows?


Different styles of photography set-ups
Different styles of set-up. Clean and minimal VS lifestyle focused with clear themes.

2. PROPS

This is where we style and accessorise the scene. Include anything ‘extra’ you would like us to show, other than the main product. This could include things like:

  • Food and Drinks

  • Flavour Cues

  • Glasses and Tableware

  • Decorations

  • Flowers and Plants


3. RATIO

A small but important part of any photography brief is specifying which ratio you want your images shot in.

For example, landscape, portrait or square?

If you’re unsure, let us know where you plan to post the content and we can advise you.


The last thing you want is to receive a wide landscape image which you need to post to Instagram Stories!


Product photography examples of image aspect ratios
Examples of different ratios - square, portrait and landscape

4. STORYBOARDS

If we’re shooting a stop-motion or video, you could try writing a basic storyboard so we are aware of any key points we need to include. Don't forget to specify if your video needs to be a certain length!



5. REFERENCE IMAGES

It’s really helpful if you can provide your photographer with some reference imagery.

This helps us understand what kind of style you like, or don’t like!

It doesn’t need to show the same product, just look out for general styling, lighting etc.



6. BONUS DETAILS

Any extra details you'd like to include will always be welcome, for example:

  • Recipes for any food or drinks we need to make

  • Specific target audiences

  • Preferences in colours

  • Do you want the packaging on display or removed?


If you're stuck, you can always ask. We're here to help!


We hope that this guide to food photography has been helpful, but if you have any questions or there's something we didn't cover, don't hesitate to ask or drop us a comment!👇


About us

We are Future Proof Photography Ltd, a creative studio on a mission to bring your brand to life and share its story with the world, one scroll-stopping piece of content at a time. We specialise in product photography, videography and stop motion animations for food, drink and lifestyle brands of all sizes.


Get in touch

Want to book in a product shoot or find out more about our creative services? Get in touch via the 'Contact' page on our website, or shoot an email to hello@futureproofcreative.co.uk 📸⁠

Recent Posts

See All

Commenti


bottom of page